In many of the neighborhoods targeted by the de Blasio administration for a rezoning, rising levels of rent are occurring simultaneous to increases in poverty in certain census tracts—creating a complicated picture, where the threats of gentrification are felt equally alongside the pains of deprivation. According to the report, released in conjunction with the 2016 State of New York City Housing and Neighborhoods Report, in the 2011-2015 span, 20.6 percent of New Yorkers lived in poverty—up from 2006-2010, when 19.1 percent of New Yorkers were considered impoverished. A family of two adults and two children is considered below the poverty line if their annual income is less than $24,036. Read more

May’s rental transactions of $15,000 or higher more than doubled compared to last year. 

An influx of new development rentals, and a large number of new leases signed over $15,000, pushed median rental prices up in Manhattan this May according to Douglas Elliman’s monthly market report tracking rental prices in the borough as well as Brooklyn and Queens. In Manhattan, May’s median rental price increased 2.2 percent from last year to $3,475, while the average rental price rose 4.4 percent, to $4,208. Jonathan Miller, author of the report, explains that the only reason for that price bump “is that there was simply a lot more new development rental product in the mix.” Read more 

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Book gentrification New York City De Blasio Bloomberg Urban Planning

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